The Reality of Mobile Security Threats

Every once in a while articles pop up claiming that mobile security threats are overblown. If you’ve never experienced a security threat, it might seem that way to you, too. So let’s look at some numbers for security incidents to see how often they’re actually happening and the methods hackers use to access sensitive data.

The 2013 Data Breach Investigations Report compiled information from Verizon and security organizations around the world. They found that there were more than 47,000 security incidents reported in 2012, with 621 confirmed data breaches and at least 44 million compromised records that they were able to quantify, since the full extent of the record loss was not known for 85% of the breaches.

Security breaches were most often accomplished through hacking (52% of the time) or through the use of malware (40% of the time). The most common types of compromised data were credentials (38%), internal data (24%) and trade secrets (20%).

Perhaps the most sobering number is this: for 66% of security incidents, it took months or longer to discover that data had been compromised. Your sensitive data could already have been exposed, and you wouldn’t even know it yet.

Two-thirds of breaches involved data stored or “at rest” on databases and file servers. The other third was being processed at the time it was compromised.

Clutch Mobile Security

At Clutch Mobile, our security technologies ensure that critical data is encrypted when in motion and at rest. Our data loss prevention engines have been optimized to work with any method mobile apps use to transport data, including HTTP, HTTPS, SMTP, IMAP and custom protocols, ensuring your data is protected regardless of what network, mobile device or app you’re using.

It’s clear that mobile security threats are a reality, and they’re happening more often than you may think. Tomorrow, we’ll post about how you can protect your company’s sensitive data.

One thought on “The Reality of Mobile Security Threats

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s